Trump puts stamp on U.S. immigration, moves ahead with wall and security policy

Trump puts stamp on U.S. immigration, moves ahead with wall and security policy

President Donald Trump’s first days in office could be considered well spent regarding the issuing of several executive orders. On his third full working day, he ordered the construction of a U.S.-Mexican border wall and punishment for cities shielding illegal immigrants as he launched broad plans to reshape U.S. immigration and national security policy. 
 
On Wednesday, he signaled a tough action toward the roughly 11 million illegal immigrants already in the United States, most from Latin America, whom he already has threatened to deport.  In addition, a draft executive order that Trump is expected to sign in the coming days would also block the entry of refugees from war-torn Syria and suspend the entry of any immigrants from Muslim-majority Middle Eastern and African countries Syria, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran,  Libya, and Yemen while permanent rules are studied.
 
"Beginning today, the United States of America gets back control of its borders," Trump told employees of the Department of Homeland Security at the department's headquarters in Washington, where he signed the orders.
 
Speaking of the wall, experts believe that it will push through in the long run. The first reason is that it will define Trump’s legacy, at least to the people who have voted for him.
 
 “Something too many people have forgotten about the border wall is that the American people actually want it. They've wanted it for years. They've wanted it at least since President Bill Clinton started to promise to improve border security with new barriers back in 1995,” CNBC journalist Jake Novak explained. He said that the highest votes that Trump got were mostly from the states near the border, a reality that could encourage the new president to act on his promise despite oppositions from the Democrats.
 
From time to time, as he was during the campaign, Trump still shows his tendency to vacillate. In his latest interview, he suggested the deportation of “young” illegal immigrants is not a priority. But the question lies in how young is “young,” or if he’s serious this time. Conversely, right after this declaration, he said he would put an end to the DACA program and everything Obama did to expand it.
 
For the most part, especially when pressured by the media, Trump chooses the safe side by saying that it is not his intention to deport immigrants—“only the illegals, and those with criminal records,” as he would always say. He hasn’t talked about the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program yet, but he said that the fate of the DREAMers or its 750,000 beneficiaries have nothing to worry. The reason, as Press Secretary Spicer stated, is that Trump would wait for the Congress to act on this matter.  
 
"First and foremost, the President's been very, very clear that we need to direct agencies to focus on those who are in this country illegally and have a record, a criminal record or pose a threat to the American people. That's where the priority is going to be," Press Secretary Spicer told the press.
 
As of today, the federal government is still accepting applications for DACA. But it’s still early to say if the DREAMers can now rejoice. A lot can change in a day, and Trump still got a few hundred more ahead of him. Indeed, it’s still early to say. 
 
 


Talk to one of our US immigration lawyers for more information about obtaining Visa to America.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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